logos background logos background Logo ETH Logo Insight ETH Zurich on Mars
En De
Page content starts here
News

News

Successful positioning of seismometer

Successful positioning of seismometer

Since the SEIS package with the sensors was placed on the ground about one meter away from the spacecraft, recent progress has focussed on levelling SEIS. Further work focused on removing ambient noise disturbing SEIS. One source of such noise is probably the tether - the cable between the lander and SEIS.

The tether has been let down to the ground to remove tension in the cable. The past few days have been spent releasing a shunt on the tether near SEIS, creating a mechanical separation between the tether and the seismometer in order to further stop noise reaching the sensor. Additionally, the seismometer has now crouched down in order to hear faint signals better. Now that SEIS is levelled, the main sensor, the VBB, has since begun sending back data. First impressions look good, but there is still a lot of analysis to be conducted.

Seismometer in position

Seismometer in position

InSight placed today its seismometer on the surface of Mars. We cannot wait to register and analyze first marsquakes!

2018-12-13

News from the Red Planet

News from the Red Planet

InSight landed successfully on Mars on 26 November 2018 and had some time to settle, i.e. extending its robotic arm. An Instrument Deployment Camera (IDC), located on its elbow, is going to take photos of the terrain in front of the lander. These images will help mission team members determine where to set InSight's seismometer and heat flow probe — the only instruments ever to be robotically placed on the surface of another planet. A full mosaic of what InSight surroundings look like is expected by early next week.

Another camera, called the Instrument Context Camera, is located under the lander's deck. It will also offer views of the workspace, though the view won't be as pretty as dust accumulated on its lens.
Placement of the instruments is critical, and the team is therefore proceeding with caution. It could take up to two to three months before the instruments have been situated and calibrated.
Two of InSight’s sensors, an air pressure sensor inside the lander and the seismometer sitting on the lander's deck, captured the sound of wind on 1 December 2018, from northwest to southeast.
This is the only phase of the mission during which the seismometer, called the Seismic Experiment for Interior Structure (SEIS), will be capable of detecting vibrations generated directly by the lander. Soon, it will be placed on the Martian surface by InSight's robotic arm in order to detect the lander's movement, allowing it to detect marsquakes. SEIS will detect vibrations caused by them, that can tell us more about the Red Planet’s interior.
Listen how wind sounds on Mars for yourself here.

2018-11-26

InSight landed on Mars!

InSight landed on Mars!

On 26 November 2018 the time had come: InSight successfully landed on the Elysium plain. This was not an easy task. It was only possible thanks to technologies that had been tried and tested in earlier missions and played together perfectly. The InSight mission had to overcome additional difficulties: Compared to other Mars missions, it entered the atmosphere with a slower velocity, was heavier, landed at a higher point and at a meteorologically less favourable time due to a high risk of sandstorms. Beginning from the entry into the atmosphere, the entire landing took six minutes. By this time, the mission had already covered a distance of approximately 483 million kilometres and spent 205 days in space.

The successful landing is an important milestone in fulfilling the scientific objectives of the mission. At ETH Zurich, we are particularly interested in the origin and development of Mars and its inner structure. We can therefore hardly wait until the seismometer is set down on the surface of Mars and the first measurement data arrives, which researchers from the Swiss Seismological Service at ETH and the Institute of Geophysics will then immediately evaluate. InSight is thus also the start of a new era: For the first time, scientific data on the before-mentioned topics will be collected and the first results will be awaited with anticipation. First marsquake measurements are expected for early January if everything goes according to plan.

Have you missed it? Watch the landing here.

2018-11-26

InSight landing live at bQm

InSight landing live at bQm

On 26 November 2018, it's time: InSight lands on Mars and bQm is the place to be to cheer along.

The landing of the InSight lander on Mars promises to be exciting again! Only if it succeeds will researchers at ETH Zurich be able to evaluate first data to find out more about the interior of the red planet. The fact that a successful landing is not that easy is demonstrated by the 60 percent of Mars missions that did not reach their destination as planned.

For a safe landing, a number of different actions need to be perfectly coordinated. First of all, InSight will rotate in such a way that it breaks through the atmosphere with its heat shield first. This shield protects the lander from temperatures of up to 1,500 C°. Then the parachute opens. After entering the atmosphere, the parachute slows the beginning rate of fall (385 m/s) until landing. In support, retro-rockets will be launched to additionally slow down the fall within the last 100 meters.

Come and help us to keep our fingers crossed! The live broadcast of the NASA coverage at bQm starts at 8 pm. The landing is scheduled for around 8.50 pm and we expect to receive first pictures from Mars at 9.15 p.m.. We recommend arriving earlier due to the limited number of seats.

Watch the landing live

bQm Kulturcafe & Bar | Leonhardstrasse 34 | 8092 Zürich | www.bqm-bar.ch

Download event flyer

2018-10-02

Watching the Martian form a different angle

Watching the Martian form a different angle

With its movie "The Martian", Hollywood has shaped the vision many people have of Mars and the life on it. Matt Damon fights as an astronaut for his survival on Mars after an accident. But what is true about this vision and what will we learn with the InSight mission about the interior of the red planet? Join us on 17 October 2018 for a screening and take the chance to discuss with professor Domenico Giardini, doctoral student Grace Crain, and astrophysicist Kevin Schwaninski about reality and fiction. The event will take place in the AudiMax located in the main building of ETH Zurich starting at 15.30.

Further information and the link to the register can be found here (participation is free of charge).

2018-08-20

InSight reached half-time mark

InSight already covered more than half of the distance between Earth and Mars. The spacecraft is currently travelling at a speed of ca. 9 980 km per hour and has to cover a total distance of about 483 million km. Its flight path was already corrected twice and InSight is expected to land on Mars on 26 November 2018. This is of course only possible because of the valuable work of many contributors. NASA now provides the possibility to meet some of those professionals in a mini web series. Get to know some of the people that made this whole mission possible here.

2018-05-23

ETH celebrates lift-off

ETH celebrates lift-off

After InSight's lift-off, more than 100 people gathered on May 22nd in the focusTerra exhibition "Expedition Solar System" and celebrated this milestone.

2018-05-07

Lift-off slideshow

Lift-off slideshow

Explore breathtaking footage of InSight's lift-off in our slideshow.

Media reports

TV

Mars: l'EPFZ en mission (RTS Un, Le journal 19h30, 5.5.2018)

Bei der neuesten Mars-Mission "InSight" der Nasa sind auch Messgeräte der ETH Zürich dabei (SRF 1, Tagesschau Spätausgabe, 5.5.2018)

Die NASA will das Innere des Mars erforschen (SRF 1, Tagesschau Hauptausgabe, 4.5.2018)

La Svizzera partecipa a una missione internazionale su Marte (RSI LA 1, Telegiornale sera, 4.5.2018)

Forscher der NASA wollen dem Mars seine innersten Geheimnisse entlocken (SRF 1, Tagesschau 18.00, 4.5.2018)

 

Online

3, 2, 1...liftoff! ETH Zurich is onboard NASA's InSight mission to Mars (cnnmoney.ch, 7.5.2018)

Schweizer Wissen unterstützt neue Weltraummission (cafe-europe.info, 7.5.2018)

Schweizer Fachwissen stützt neue Weltraummission (greaterzuricharea.com, 7.5.2018)

Sur Mars avec l’EPF de Zurich (laliberte.ch, 7.5.2018)

Ein Stück Zürich fliegt zum Mars (nzz.ch, 6.5.2018)

InSight into Red Planet NASA's mission to Mars launches with Swiss technology onboard (swissinfo.ch, 6.5.2018)

ETH fühlt den Puls des Mars (blick.ch, 5.5.2018)

Nasa-Raumsonde InSight Richtung Mars gestartet (20min.ch, 5.5.2018)

«InSight»-Lander zum Roten Planeten gestartet (srf.ch, 5.5.2018)

Mission «InSight» gestartet: Die Landefähre ist zum Mars aufgebrochen (nzz.ch, 5.5.2018)

Jetzt startet ETH-Sonde zum Mars (tagesanzeiger.ch, 5.5.2018)

Schweizer Computer fliegt zum Mars (toponline.ch, 4.5.2018)

Schweizer Fachwissen stützt neue Weltraummission (unternehmerzeitung.ch, 4.5.2018)

Un sismomètre de l'EPFZ va s'envoler sur Mars (lematin.ch, 4.5.2018)

Expedition ins Innere des Mars (nzz.ch, 4.5.2018)

Nasa-Marslander Insight soll am Samstag ins All starten (DerStandard.at, 2.5.2018)

Schweizer Qualität Seismograf entlockt dem Mars Geheimnisse (swissinfo.ch, 2.5.2018)

InSIGHT va ausculter Mars pour nous permettre de mieux la comprendre (letemps.ch, 1.5.2018)

Die ETH Zürich fliegt zum Mars (Der Bund, 30.4.2018)

ETH-Forscher wollen mit Nasa-Mission das Innere des Mars erkunden (blick.ch, 30.4.2018)

Europäer fotografieren den Mars (Wiener Zeitung Online, 30.4.2018)

Die ETH Zürich fliegt zum Mars (tagesanzeiger.ch, 30.4.2018)

ETH-Forscher wollen das Innere des Mars erkunden (Futurezone.ORF.at, 29.4.2018)

Print

Ein Stück Zürich fliegt zum Mars (Neue Zürcher Zeitung NZZ, 7.5.2018)

Hier startet die ETH-Sonde zum Mars (Basler Zeitung, 7.5.2018)

Nasa-Raumsonde InSight gestartet (20 Minuten Zürich, 5.5.2018)

Expedition ins Innere des Mars (Neue Zürcher Zeitung NZZ, 4.5.2018)

InSight, une plongée dans les mystérieux sous-sols de Mars (Le Temps, 3.5.2018)

Den Mars entzaubern (Berner Zeitung, Ausgabe Stadt + Region Bern, 1.5.2018)

ETH will das Marsinnere erkunden (Der Landbote, 30.4.2018)

Bestes Seismometer für den Mars (Tages-Anzeiger, 30.4.2018)

ETH-Forscher wollen mit Nasa-Mission das Innere des Mars erkunden (Schweizerische Depeschenagentur SDA, 29.4.2018)